Data Analysis
Data Analysis

Data analysis provides us with an examination and interpretation of the recent and historical business events. We perform this analysis on the data collected in and integrated with data management environment.

In order to properly perform the analysis we must first formulate the questions related to the problem we wish to solve. Asking the right questions is the first step in performing the analysis. Asking the right questions leads to the creation of the proper queries we'll use against the collected data. As we've stated before those questions can be grouped into three (3) fundamental questions.

How are we doing as a company?

Who are our customers?

Are we secure?

Operations Intelligence

How are we doing as a company?

This area of business intelligence provides insight into how well the enterprise is functioning. How effective and efficient are the assets of the enterprise performing? These assets include personnel, machinery and vendors.

Personnel are the key asset of any enterprise. How they are performing directly affects the customer experience and the bottom line. Understanding personnel from a data driven process can provide the enterprise with an unbiased view.

Machinery includes computers, point of sale equipment, vehicles, manufacturing hardware, computers as well as the different monitors within buildings that house the enterprise. Each of these assets generates data that can be gathered and examined. Each can provide further insight into the effectiveness of the enterprise.

Operations Intelligence should also include the enterprise vendors, the supply chain and enterprise logistics. The data of the enterprise of people and things is collected and analyzed to provide total operational intelligence.
Customer Intelligence

Who are our customers?

Customer Intelligence is the collection of data and analysis that is used to examine sales, marketing, products, customers and the customer experience. This area of business intelligence is focused and organized to support a corporations sales, marketing and customer support personnel. It also provides company executives with an overview of their business transactions. We call this Customer Intelligence to emphasize the importance of a customer centric philosophy within an enterprise and its processes.

The goal of Customer Intelligence is to have a data driven understanding of who is the customer. Who are the past, present and future customers of the enterprise. Who are past customers but not customers today. Why are they not customers today? Who is not a customer today and how can they become a customer in the future. Who are our current customers? This includes understanding what, when, how and why the customer purchases from the enterprise.

What the customer buys pertains to products sold by the enterprise. When defines daily, monthly, seasonal buying habits and volumes. How defines the methods, locations and interfaces used to make the purchases. Customer Intelligence also includes understanding the customer experience with the enterprise. Why the customer purchases gives us insight into the needs that the product satisfies and what other needs currently exist. It should also help define the decision process used by the customers.

Security Intelligence

Are we secure?

We separate Security Intelligence because of the highly critical and specialized nature of security within the modern enterprise. Included in this is not only computer network security and external threat detection but also internal theft and fraud as well as physical security. In the industry Security Event Information Management (SEIM) is the analysis of all collected data in order to find security holes, intrusions and suspicious events.